Director’s Blog

Exposome Perspectives

A blog by Robert O. Wright, MD, MPH

Dr. Robert Wright is a pediatrician, medical toxicologist, and environmental epidemiologist at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. He is the Ethel H. Wise Chair of the Department of Environmental Medicine and Public Health, Co-Director of the Institute for Exposomic Research, and Principal Investigator of an ongoing longitudinal birth cohort in Mexico City (Programming Research in Obesity, Growth, Environment and Social Stress–PROGRESS) in collaboration with the National Institute of Public Health, Mexico. He also founded the MATCH (Metals Assessment Targeting Community Health) study in Tar Creek, Oklahoma.

On his blog he provides a unique, eye-level, perspective into the worlds of environmental health research, precision medicine, and the role of exposomics in understanding, preventing and treating disease.


A Son’s Reflection on His Mother’s Life Journey

Dr. Robert Wright reflects on the life of his mother—Naoko Yogi Wright, a woman who grew up in extreme poverty, survived war and moved half-way across the globe to a foreign culture in hope of giving opportunity to her children, all the while continuing to contribute to the lives of the family she left behind in Okinawa.

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Science and Art

The Aleph and Systems Biology

Is it possible that your risk for disease was set when you were a baby? Evidence shows that our earliest years of life are perhaps the most important for understanding the origins of many health outcomes.

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Reflections on the 20th Commemoration of September 11

We owe an extraordinary debt to the heroes of September 11, and to their brothers and sisters who survived that day but still bear the physical and mental health effects, as well as the scars and wounds of sorrow and loss. The World Trade Center Health Program is part of how we honor that debt.

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The “Fetal Origins” of Adult Disease

Is it possible that your risk for disease was set when you were a baby? Evidence shows that our earliest years of life are perhaps the most important for understanding the origins of many health outcomes.

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